Dialog and Effect: A panel discussion on climate change and personal responses, with movement performance.

Dialog and Effect: A panel discussion on climate change…

When: Sunday February 24th, 2019 at 2pm-5pm

Where: Wave Street Studios, 774 Wave St, Monterey, CA 93940 (1-1/2 blocks south of the Monterey Bay Aquarium)

If you're not able to attend the event in person, you can go to the Youtube Live Stream with opportunity to post questions to the speakers:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYt0d8GPDzM

Radio Interviews on "Transformation Highway" at noon PST on KZSC 88.1 FM,  University of California, Santa Cruz

A panel discussion and dance performance/participatory movement meditation on the current state of climate science, energy policy, cultural memes and view on climate and environment, with an international panel of journalists, academics and artists.  All are invited to participate in the discussion, which will be live-streamed from Wave Street Studios, an exemplary eco-architecture/event space/cafe-roastery in downtown Monterey.  After the discussion, Movementlab will lead a performance/dance in the space.

Researcher from UC Santa Cruz Kevin Bell, Humphrey Fellow from UC Davis Angelina Davydova,  Environmental writer and English professor at Evergreen Valley College Steven "Rabbit" Mentor, and artist and musician Trey Donovan engage in a conversation to discuss how global environmental and climate challenges are connected to our everyday behaviors and habits. Where are the limits of our responsibilities and the borders of our actions? How can we trace the consequences of our choices in an ever-more interconnected world? What could be the motivation for the most of us, what kind of support do communities need, how can we pressure companies and corporations to change their business-as-usual approach, and what about the role of politicians?

Last year an Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its special report on describing a 1.5C (2.7F) rise in global warming. One of the main ideas behind the paper is that we have very little time to make changes to our economic system and our lives, to reduce use of fossil fuels, to increase resource-efficiency -- and to adapt to the changing climate of our planet. The global concentration of greenhouse gases keeps growing, that it why scientists tell us the world should go carbon-free by mid-century, and that means very soon. How this transformation can at all be possible, can it also be socially just and equitable? Is there such a thing as personal responsibility?

Following the discussion, MovementLab (Nadine Lollino, Trey Donovan and Mathew Schreiber) will conduct a performance and a group class in movement meditation, drawing on movement art traditions of butoh, classical modern dance, Iyengar yoga, dance therapy, taichi, and Gaga. In the interest of following the theme of investigation of individual habits and contribution to global environmental concerns, and remediation, we see that conscious transformation begins with the individual and moves toward a collective effort.  This can be demonstrated in the simple work of moving in space together, as well as in a space designed for such work. 

When we move together, we are struck with impressions of our surroundings, our neighbors, and the internal environment, or attitude.  In moving together in a meditative space, it is possible to bring attention to the simplest efforts, and perhaps change, however minute, is a potential outcome.  Collectively, the efforts of many become a way of life that can transform our existence, and give the relationship between humans and earth, a chance at positive change.

(In case you are not on-site, you may send questions and comments through the YouTube event page)

Angelina Davydova is an environmental journalist from St. Petersburg, Russia, regularly contributing to Russian and international media, including the Kommersant, the Thomson Reuters Foundation, and Science magazine. She specializes in covering economic and political aspects of global and Russian climate policies, including the UN climate negotiations, which she has been attending since 2008. She teaches at the School of Journalism, St. Petersburg State University and the Saint Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics. She is also a director of the Office of Environmental Information in St. Petersburg, Russia (a non-profit organization focusing on developing environmental journalism in Russia and neighboring countries and also developing international cooperation in environmental and climate areas). She was a Reuters Foundation Fellow at Oxford University in 2006 and she was a participant of the Beahrs Environmental Leadership Program (ELP) at UC Berkeley in 2012. Currently, she is a Humphrey Fellow at UC Davis for 2018-2019.

 

Kevin Bell is and instructor and one of the founding core faculty for a new, cross-disciplinary Sustainability Minor at Rachel Carson College, UC Santa Cruz. He brings over thirty years of experience in resource-related public policy and resilient innovation, working in staff, management, negotiation, and consulting capacities in the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors as a hydrologist, researcher, regulator, intervenor, negotiator, and advocate on behalf of next-generation sustainable technologies and practices. His expertise includes the design and implementation of effective energy, water, and climate models, strategies, and public policies for enabling a sustainable human-built world. He is also an experienced instructional designer, and founding CEO of a successful startup social venture, which developed a new generation of STEM basal curricula and educational tools. He received his MPA from  Harvard Kennedy School.

Dr. Steven Mentor, aka Rabbit, teaches the working class of Silicon Valley during the day (at Evergreen Valley College in San Jose) and by night lives in a castle in Santa Cruz with his wife Margann the midwife, his son Bailey the green construction laborer, his terrier Chinese crested (we think) mix doggo, and Others of equal importance. He did the English literature/rhetoric dances at U of Pennsylvania (thanks flawed founding father Ben Franklin!) and Stanford (thanks, robber baron Stanford!) before being turned to the Dark Side and becoming an activist and facilitator. He enjoys long walks in literary and discursive parks, sunset laws for polluting industries, and imagining us not torching the planet quite as badly as it seems we are doing. He reads both widely and narrowly and is excited at the prospect of meeting you, dear Reader.

His research topics include cyborgs, climate fiction, composition theory and practice, and the social studies of science. He lives with 75 or so other people in a cohousing situation in west Santa Cruz. He prays regularly for snow, and for cold temperatures in the mountains.

 

Nadine Lollino has been creating and performing in the arts of dance, costume making and video since 2002. She is currently working under her solo creation, MovementLab, and also co-founder of multi-media collective PosterchildArt. Nadine has previously danced with Anatomical Dance Theater, Breakbone Dance Co., and the Humans, all Chicago-based companies. She has been presenting her own works since 2005, traveling nationally and internationally. Nadine also practices massage therapy and teaches yoga. She has been developing Moving Meditation classes, a freeform movement practice for all communities to connect to the healing found in dance and music. Nadine is currently based in Santa Cruz, California.

Trey Donovan brings together such diverse cultural elements as music/sound-art, language, dance, sculpture, structure and technology to synthesize impressions of our place in the universe. His recent projects involve him in music and dance composition and improvisation, and draw on influences from nature, culture, and experimental artistic discoveries.
Trey has studied, taught and performed with a variety of butoh-based companies and teachers since 2001, in the SF Bay Area, Pacific Northwest, Russia, Finland and Italy. He currently lives in Santa Cruz, Ca.

Mathew Schreiber Sound Sculptor, Beat Explorer, Curator of Found Sounds, Actor and Acting Coach based in Santa Cruz.  His approach is that of a curious designer, looking for what each moment needs in order to bring the scene to its fullest expression.

About the venue

Wave Street Studios is located next to Cannery Row and the Monterey Bay Aquarium, is an ultra-green-built community space which regularly hosts yoga classes, discussions on a wide variety of topics and is a profoundly beautiful event space with a built-in cafe, a professional broadcast studio with a cast concrete sound stage and sprung bamboo dance floor.

The discussions will be live-streamed, and uploaded to their youtube channel.